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AuthorTitleYearJournal/ProceedingsReftypeDOI/URL
Buckingham, G. and Carey, D.P. Attentional asymmetries - cause or consequence of human right handedness? 2014 Frontiers in psychology
Vol. 5, pp. 1587 
article DOI URL 
Abstract: It is well established that the vast majority of the population favors their right hand when performing complex manual tasks. However, the developmental and evolutionary underpinnings of human manual asymmetries remain contentious. One often overlooked suggestion is that right handedness may stem from an asymmetrical bias in attention, with the right hand being allocated more attentional resources during bimanual tasks than the left hand (Peters, 1981). This review examines the evidence for attentional asymmetries during a variety of bimanual tasks, and critically evaluates the explanatory power of this hypothesis for explaining the depth and breadth of individual- and population-level manual asymmetries. We conclude that, while the attentional bias hypothesis is well-supported in adults, it requires further validation from a developmental perspective to explain the full breadth of adult manual laterality.
BibTeX:
@article{Buckingham2014a,
  author = {Buckingham, Gavin and Carey, David P},
  title = {Attentional asymmetries - cause or consequence of human right handedness?},
  journal = {Frontiers in psychology},
  publisher = {Frontiers Media SA},
  year = {2014},
  volume = {5},
  pages = {1587},
  url = {http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25628594 http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=PMC4292221},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01587}
}
Faurie, C. and Raymond, M. The fighting hypothesis as an evolutionary explanation for the handedness polymorphism in humans: Where are we? 2013 Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Vol. 1288(1) 
article DOI  
Abstract: The ubiquitous and persistent handedness polymorphism in humans requires an evolutionary explanation. It has been suggested that left-handers have a frequency-dependent advantage during a fight, such that this advantage decreases when their frequency increases. Many independent studies are providing data from interactive sports (a specific class of fights), and are very supportive of the fighting hypothesis. The only intercultural study on traditional societies is also consistent with the fighting hypothesis, although it has not yet been replicated. The frequencies of left-handers in the few remaining violent societies are likely to be rapidly decreasing, due to Western colonization (long-range weapons, religion, and money market) dramatically affecting the frequency-dependent selection associated with handedness. Clearly, more data are urgently needed outside the Western influence.
BibTeX:
@article{Faurie2013,
  author = {Faurie, Charlotte and Raymond, Michel},
  title = {The fighting hypothesis as an evolutionary explanation for the handedness polymorphism in humans: Where are we?},
  journal = {Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year = {2013},
  volume = {1288},
  number = {1},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nyas.12159}
}
Feindel, W., Leblanc, R.(N. and Institut neurologique de Montreal The wounded brain healed : the golden age of the Montreal Neurological Institute, 1934-1984 2016 , pp. 632  book URL 
Abstract: "In 1934 Wilder Penfield's vision of an establishment dedicated to the relief of sickness and pain and the study of neurology lead to the creation of the Montreal Neurological Institute. Setting the standard for neurological research and care for patients disabled by neurological illnesses, Penfield's institute became a beacon of light in a largely unexplored field of medicine. The Wounded Brain Healed describes the pioneering research that took place during the MNI's first fifty years. During the institute's golden age, Penfield and his colleagues designed the EEG test for the study of epileptic patients, discovered some of the causes of epilepsy, and developed new treatments that have since been adopted worldwide. Additionally, they delineated the sensory and motor representation in the cerebral cortex and localized the major areas of the brain related to speech. The institute also boasts the discoveries of two types of memory--one serving immediate recall, the other long term--as well as the discovery of the localization of short-term memory to the inner structures of the temporal lobe. Physicians and scientists who trained at the MNI went on to establish renowned neurology and neurosurgery departments throughout Canada, the United States, Europe, Asia, and Latin America. Recounting the story of one of Canada's greatest contributions to international medical science through archival research, personal interviews, photographs, illustrations, and paintings, The Wounded Brain Healed provides fascinating insight into the institution that had a global and lasting impact."--
BibTeX:
@book{Feindel,
  author = {Feindel, William and Leblanc, Richard (Neurosurgeon) and Institut neurologique de Montreal},
  title = {The wounded brain healed : the golden age of the Montreal Neurological Institute, 1934-1984},
  year = {2016},
  pages = {632},
  url = {http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0964704X.2017.1286919}
}
Fitch, W.T. and Braccini, S.N. Primate laterality and the biology and evolution of human handedness: A review and synthesis 2013 Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Vol. 1288(1) 
article DOI  
BibTeX:
@article{Fitch2013,
  author = {Fitch, W. Tecumseh and Braccini, Stephanie N.},
  title = {Primate laterality and the biology and evolution of human handedness: A review and synthesis},
  journal = {Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year = {2013},
  volume = {1288},
  number = {1},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/nyas.12071}
}
Flindall, J.W. and Gonzalez, C.L.R. On the evolution of handedness: Evidence for feeding biases 2013 PLoS ONE
Vol. 8(11) 
article DOI  
Abstract: Many theories have been put forward to explain the origins of right-handedness in humans. Here we present evidence that this preference may stem in part from a right hand advantage in grasping for feeding. Thirteen participants were asked to reach-to-grasp food items of 3 different sizes: SMALL (Cheeriostextregistered), MEDIUM (Froot Loopstextregistered), and LARGE (Oatmeal Squarestextregistered). Participants used both their right- and left-hands in separate blocks (50 trials each, starting order counterbalanced) to grasp the items. After each grasp, participants either a) ate the food item, or b) placed it inside a bib worn beneath his/her chin (25 trials each, blocked design, counterbalanced). The conditions were designed such that the outward and inward movement trajectories were similar, differing only in the final step of placing it in the mouth or bib. Participants wore Plato liquid crystal goggles that blocked vision between trials. All trials were conducted in closed-loop with 5000 ms of vision. Hand kinematics were recorded by an Optotrak Certus, which tracked the position of three infrared diodes attached separately to the index finger, thumb, and wrist. We found a task (EAT/PLACE) by hand (LEFT/RIGHT) interaction on maximum grip aperture (MGA; the maximum distance between the index finger and thumb achieved during grasp pre-shaping). MGAs were smaller during right-handed movements, but only when grasping with intent to eat. Follow-up tests show that the RIGHT-HAND/EAT MGA was significantly smaller than all other hand/task conditions. Because smaller grip apertures are typically associated with greater precision, our results demonstrate a right-hand advantage for the grasp-to-eat movement. From an evolutionary perspective, early humans may have preferred the hand that could grasp food with more precision, thereby maximizing the likelihood of retrieval, consumption, and consequently, survival.
BibTeX:
@article{Flindall2013,
  author = {Flindall, Jason W. and Gonzalez, Claudia L R},
  title = {On the evolution of handedness: Evidence for feeding biases},
  journal = {PLoS ONE},
  year = {2013},
  volume = {8},
  number = {11},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0078967}
}
Groppe, D.M. Combating the scientific decline effect with confidence ( intervals ) 2017 Psychophysiology
Vol. 54, pp. 139-145 
article DOI  
BibTeX:
@article{Groppe2017,
  author = {Groppe, David M},
  title = {Combating the scientific decline effect with confidence ( intervals )},
  journal = {Psychophysiology},
  year = {2017},
  volume = {54},
  pages = {139--145},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/psyp.12616}
}
Hugdahl, K. and Westerhausen, R. Speech processing asymmetry revealed by dichotic listening and functional brain imaging 2016 Neuropsychologia
Vol. 93, pp. 466-481 
article DOI  
Abstract: In this article, we review research in our laboratory from the last 25 to 30 years on the neuronal basis for laterality of speech perception focusing on the upper, posterior parts of the temporal lobes, and its functional and structural connections to other brain regions. We review both behavioral and brain imaging data, with a focus on dichotic listening experiments, and using a variety of imaging modalities. The data have come in most parts from healthy individuals and from studies on normally functioning brain, although we also review a few selected clinical examples. We first review and discuss the structural model for the explanation of the right-ear advantage (REA) and left hemisphere asymmetry for auditory language processing. A common theme across many studies have been our interest in the interaction between bottom-up, stimulus-driven, and top-down, instruction-driven, aspects of hemispheric asymmetry, and how perceptual factors interact with cognitive factors to shape asymmetry of auditory language information processing. In summary, our research have shown laterality for the initial processing of consonant–vowel syllables, first observed as a behavioral REA when subjects are required to report which syllable of a dichotic syllable-pair they perceive. In subsequent work we have corroborated the REA with brain imaging, and have shown that the REA is modulated through both bottom-up manipulations of stimulus properties, like sound intensity, and top-down manipulations of cognitive properties, like attention focus.
BibTeX:
@article{Hugdahl2016,
  author = {Hugdahl, Kenneth and Westerhausen, René},
  title = {Speech processing asymmetry revealed by dichotic listening and functional brain imaging},
  journal = {Neuropsychologia},
  year = {2016},
  volume = {93},
  pages = {466--481},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2015.12.011}
}
Keil, A. Introduction to the special issue on recentering science : Replication , robustness , and reproducibility in psychophysiology 2017 Psychophysiology
Vol. 54, pp. 3-5 
article DOI  
BibTeX:
@article{Keil2017,
  author = {Keil, Andreas},
  title = {Introduction to the special issue on recentering science : Replication , robustness , and reproducibility in psychophysiology},
  journal = {Psychophysiology},
  year = {2017},
  volume = {54},
  pages = {3--5},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/psyp.12787}
}
McGrath, R.L. and Kantak, S.S. Reduced asymmetry in motor skill learning in left-handed compared to right-handed individuals 2016 Human Movement Science
Vol. 45 
article DOI  
Abstract: Hemispheric specialization for motor control influences how individuals perform and adapt to goal-directed movements. In contrast to adaptation, motor skill learning involves a process wherein one learns to synthesize novel movement capabilities in absence of perturbation such that they are performed with greater accuracy, consistency and efficiency. Here, we investigated manual asymmetry in acquisition and retention of a complex motor skill that requires speed and accuracy for optimal performance in right-handed and left-handed individuals. We further determined if degree of handedness influences motor skill learning. Ten right-handed (RH) and 10 left-handed (LH) adults practiced two distinct motor skills with their dominant or nondominant arms during separate sessions two-four weeks apart. Learning was quantified by changes in the speed-accuracy tradeoff function measured at baseline and one-day retention. Manual asymmetry was evident in the RH group but not the LH group. RH group demonstrated significantly greater skill improvement for their dominant-right hand than their nondominant-left hand. In contrast, for the LH group, both dominant and nondominant hands demonstrated comparable learning. Less strongly-LH individuals (lower EHI scores) exhibited more learning of their dominant hand. These results suggest that while hemispheric specialization influences motor skill learning, these effects may be influenced by handedness.
BibTeX:
@article{McGrath2016,
  author = {McGrath, Robert L. and Kantak, Shailesh S.},
  title = {Reduced asymmetry in motor skill learning in left-handed compared to right-handed individuals},
  journal = {Human Movement Science},
  year = {2016},
  volume = {45},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humov.2015.11.012}
}
Nelson, E.L., Campbell, J.M. and Michel, G.F. Unimanual to bimanual: Tracking the development of handedness from 6 to 24 months 2013 Infant Behavior and Development
Vol. 36(2) 
article DOI  
Abstract: Manual skills change dramatically over the first two years of life, creating an interesting challenge for researchers studying the development of handedness. A vast body of work to date has focused on unimanual skills during the period from the onset of reaching to walking. The current study sought to connect such early unimanual hand use to later role-differentiated bimanual manipulation (RDBM), in which one hand stabilizes the object for the other hand's action. We examined hand use in 38 children over 16 monthly visits using a validated measure for assessing hand preference for acquiring objects when children were 6-14 months old. We also developed a new measure for assessing RDBM preference presented when children were 18-24 months old. The new measure reliably elicited RDBM actions in both toddlers and an adult control group (N= 15). Results revealed that some children show preferences for acquiring objects as infants; these preferences are stable and persist into their second year as new skills appear. Moreover, children with no hand preference during infancy shifted to left or right lateralized hand use as toddlers. Despite a higher incidence of left-handedness compared to adult norms, the majority of children were right-handed by 2 years of age. ?? 2013 Elsevier Inc.
BibTeX:
@article{Nelson2013,
  author = {Nelson, Eliza L. and Campbell, Julie M. and Michel, George F.},
  title = {Unimanual to bimanual: Tracking the development of handedness from 6 to 24 months},
  journal = {Infant Behavior and Development},
  year = {2013},
  volume = {36},
  number = {2},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.infbeh.2013.01.009}
}
Papadatou-Pastou, M. and Martin, M. Cerebral laterality for language is related to adult salivary testosterone levels but not digit ratio (2D:4D) in men: A functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound study 2017 Brain and Language
Vol. 166, pp. 52-62 
article DOI  
Abstract: The adequacy of three competing theories of hormonal effects on cerebral laterality are compared using functional transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD). Thirty-three adult males participated in the study (21 left-handers). Cerebral lateralization was measured by fTCD using an extensively validated word generation task. Adult salivary testosterone (T) and cortisol (C) concentrations were measured by luminescence immunoassay and prenatal T exposure was indirectly estimated by the somatic marker of 2nd to 4th digit length ratio (2D:4D). A significant quadratic relationship between degree of cerebral laterality for language and adult T concentrations was observed, with enhanced T levels for strong left hemisphere dominance and strong right hemisphere dominance. No systematic effects on laterality were found for cortisol or 2D:4D. Findings suggest that higher levels of T are associated with a relatively attenuated degree of interhemispheric sharing of linguistic information, providing support for the callosal and the sexual differentiation hypotheses rather than the Geschwind, Behan and Galaburda (GBG) hypothesis.
BibTeX:
@article{Papadatou-Pastou2017,
  author = {Papadatou-Pastou, Marietta and Martin, Maryanne},
  title = {Cerebral laterality for language is related to adult salivary testosterone levels but not digit ratio (2D:4D) in men: A functional transcranial Doppler ultrasound study},
  journal = {Brain and Language},
  year = {2017},
  volume = {166},
  pages = {52--62},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2016.12.002}
}
Somers, M., Aukes, M.F., Ophoff, R.A., Boks, M.P., Fleer, W., de Visser, K.(C.).L., Kahn, R.S. and Sommer, I.E. On the relationship between degree of hand-preference and degree of language lateralization 2015 Brain and Language
Vol. 144 
article DOI  
Abstract: Language lateralization and hand-preference show inter-individual variation in the degree of lateralization to the left- or right, but their relation is not fully understood. Disentangling this relation could aid elucidating the mechanisms underlying these traits. The relation between degree of language lateralization and degree of hand-preference was investigated in extended pedigrees with multi-generational left-handedness (n= 310). Language lateralization was measured with functional Transcranial Doppler, hand-preference with the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory. Degree of hand-preference did not mirror degree of language lateralization. Instead, the prevalence of right-hemispheric and bilateral language lateralization rises with increasing strength of left-handedness. Degree of hand-preference does not predict degree of language lateralization, thus refuting genetic models in which one mechanism defines both hand-preference and language lateralization. Instead, our findings suggest a model in which increasing strength of left-handedness is associated with increased variation in directionality of cerebral dominance.
BibTeX:
@article{Somers2015a,
  author = {Somers, Metten and Aukes, Maartje F. and Ophoff, Roel A. and Boks, Marco P. and Fleer, Willemien and de Visser, Kees (C ) L and Kahn, René S. and Sommer, Iris E.},
  title = {On the relationship between degree of hand-preference and degree of language lateralization},
  journal = {Brain and Language},
  year = {2015},
  volume = {144},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2015.03.006}
}
Somers, M., Shields, L.S., Boks, M.P., Kahn, R.S. and Sommer, I.E. Cognitive benefits of right-handedness: A meta-analysis 2015 Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Vol. 51 
article DOI  
Abstract: Hand preference - which is related to cerebral dominance - is thought to be associated with cognitive skills; however, findings on this association are inconsistent and there is no consensus whether left- or right-handers have an advantage in either spatial or verbal abilities. In addition, it is not clear whether an interaction between sex and hand preference exists in relation to these cognitive abilities. As these matters are relevant from a neurodevelopmental perspective we performed a meta-analysis of the available literature. We searched PubMed and Embase, and included 14 studies (359,890 subjects) in the verbal ability meta-analysis and 16 studies (218,351 subjects) in the spatial ability meta-analysis. There was no difference between the full sample of left and right-handers for verbal ability, nor was there a hand preference-by-sex interaction. Subgroup analysis of children showed a small right-hand benefit. Our results further revealed a modest but significant effect favouring right-handedness for overall spatial ability, which was more pronounced when analysis was restricted to studies applying the mental rotation test. We could not identify a specific interaction with sex. Our results indicate that there is a small but significant cognitive advantage of right-handedness on spatial ability. In the verbal domain, this advantage is only significant in children. An interaction effect with sex is not confirmed.
BibTeX:
@article{Somers2015,
  author = {Somers, Metten and Shields, Laura S. and Boks, Marco P. and Kahn, Ren?? S. and Sommer, Iris E.},
  title = {Cognitive benefits of right-handedness: A meta-analysis},
  journal = {Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews},
  year = {2015},
  volume = {51},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neubiorev.2015.01.003}
}
Trafimow, D. and Earp, B.D. Null hypothesis significance testing and Type I error: The domain problem 2017 New Ideas in Psychology
Vol. 45, pp. 19-27 
article DOI  
Abstract: Although many common uses of p-values for making statistical inferences in contemporary scientific research have been shown to be invalid, no one, to our knowledge, has adequately assessed the main original justification for their use, which is that they can help to control the Type I error rate (Neyman & Pearson, 1928, 1933). We address this issue head-on by asking a specific question: Across what domain, specifically, do we wish to control the Type I error rate? For example, do we wish to control it across all of science, across all of a specific discipline such as psychology, across a researcher's active lifetime, across a substantive research area, across an experiment, or across a set of hypotheses? In attempting to answer these questions, we show that each one leads to troubling dilemmas wherein controlling the Type I error rate turns out to be inconsistent with other scientific desiderata. This inconsistency implies that we must make a choice. In our view, the other scientific desiderata are much more valuable than controlling the Type I error rate and so it is the latter, rather than the former, with which we must dispense. But by doing soâ€''that is, by eliminating the Type I error justification for computing and using p-valuesâ€''there is even less reason to believe that p is useful for validly rejecting null hypotheses than previous critics have suggested.
BibTeX:
@article{Trafimow2017,
  author = {Trafimow, David and Earp, Brian D.},
  title = {Null hypothesis significance testing and Type I error: The domain problem},
  journal = {New Ideas in Psychology},
  year = {2017},
  volume = {45},
  pages = {19--27},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.newideapsych.2017.01.002}
}
Willems, R.M., der Haegen, L.V., Fisher, S.E. and Francks, C. On the other hand: including left-handers in cognitive neuroscience and neurogenetics 2014 Nature Reviews Neuroscience
Vol. 15(3) 
article DOI  
Abstract: Left-handers are often excluded from study cohorts in neuroscience and neurogenetics in order to reduce variance in the data. However, recent investigations have shown that the inclusion or targeted recruitment of left-handers can be informative in studies on a range of topics, such as cerebral lateralization and the genetic underpinning of asymmetrical brain development. Left-handed individuals represent a substantial portion of the human population and therefore left-handedness falls within the normal range of human diversity; thus, it is important to account for this variation in our understanding of brain functioning. We call for neuroscientists and neurogeneticists to recognize the potential of studying this often-discarded group of research subjects.
BibTeX:
@article{Willems2014,
  author = {Willems, Roel M. and der Haegen, Lise Van and Fisher, Simon E. and Francks, Clyde},
  title = {On the other hand: including left-handers in cognitive neuroscience and neurogenetics},
  journal = {Nature Reviews Neuroscience},
  year = {2014},
  volume = {15},
  number = {3},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrn3679}
}
Yang, N., Waddington, G., Adams, R. and Han, J. Translation, cultural adaption, and test–retest reliability of Chinese versions of the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory and Waterloo Footedness Questionnaire 2017 Laterality: Asymmetries of Body, Brain and Cognition, pp. 1-19  article DOI URL 
BibTeX:
@article{Yang2017,
  author = {Yang, Nan and Waddington, Gordon and Adams, Roger and Han, Jia},
  title = {Translation, cultural adaption, and test–retest reliability of Chinese versions of the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory and Waterloo Footedness Questionnaire},
  journal = {Laterality: Asymmetries of Body, Brain and Cognition},
  year = {2017},
  pages = {1--19},
  url = {https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1357650X.2017.1357728},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1357650X.2017.1357728}
}
Zago, L., Petit, L., Mellet, E., Jobard, G., Crivello, F., Joliot, M., Mazoyer, B. and Tzourio-Mazoyer, N. The association between hemispheric specialization for language production and for spatial attention depends on left-hand preference strength 2016 Neuropsychologia
Vol. 93, pp. 394-406 
article DOI URL 
BibTeX:
@article{Zago2016,
  author = {Zago, Laure and Petit, Laurent and Mellet, Emmanuel and Jobard, Gaël and Crivello, Fabrice and Joliot, Marc and Mazoyer, Bernard and Tzourio-Mazoyer, Nathalie},
  title = {The association between hemispheric specialization for language production and for spatial attention depends on left-hand preference strength},
  journal = {Neuropsychologia},
  year = {2016},
  volume = {93},
  pages = {394--406},
  url = {http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0028393215302335},
  doi = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2015.11.018}
}